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Incredibly thin Edible sensors now monitor your food temperature

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sensor2 576x365 - Incredibly thin Edible sensors now monitor your food temperature

Today there is new era for sensors, Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed Biodegradble Microsensors that invented new link between food and IoT. Now everyone can able to keep watch on food, its tempreture and some more details releated to food.

This Biodegradble tiny sensors not only incredibly small but also biodegradble and biocompatiable, you can eat them and they won’t harm you because they are bio degradable.

You all know it is bit hard and sometimes difficult to check weather foods which you buy is fresh or not, test food products for its quality. Reserchers invented 16-micrometer thick sensor (If we compare that sensor with human hair, Human hair is 100 micrometer thick). Using this sensors food experts now check food tempreture and its quality easily. This sensors allows for constant and wireless monitoring of food temperatures.

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This edible sensors are made up of magnesium which is an imprtant point of our diet and other core parts of this sensors are made up of silicon and nitride and compostable polymer from potato and corn scratch. You can eat this sensors with your food and not to worry about any toxic harm to your body.

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As article on Digitaltrends According to Giovanni Salvatore, who led the research, producing biocompatible microsensors has historically been a rather time-consuming and expensive process. However, as technology becomes more advanced, many of the obstacles to the widespread proliferation of these tools could be rendered obsolete. “Once the price of biosensors falls enough, they could be used virtually anywhere,” Salvatore said in a release. Similarly, “Their use would not be limited to temperature measurement either: similar microsensors could be deployed to monitor pressure, gas build-up and UV exposure.”

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